HOME ListMoto.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

BitKeeper
BitKeeper
BitKeeper
is a software tool for distributed revision control of computer source code
[...More...]

"BitKeeper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
[...More...]

"Software Developer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Open Source
The open-source model is a decentralized software-development model that encourages open collaboration.[1][2] A main principle of open-source software development is peer production, with products such as source code, blueprints, and documentation freely available to the public. The open-source movement in software began as a response to the limitations of proprietary code. The model is used for projects such as in open-source appropriate technology,[3] and open-source drug discovery.[4][5] Open source
Open source
promotes universal access via an open-source or free license to a product's design or blueprint, and universal redistribution of that design or blueprint.[6][7] Before the phrase open source became widely adopted, developers and producers used a variety of other terms
[...More...]

"Open Source" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Free And Open-source Software
Free and open-source software
Free and open-source software
(FOSS) is software that can be classified as both free software and open-source software.[a] That is, anyone is freely licensed to use, copy, study, and change the software in any way, and the source code is openly shared so that people are encouraged to voluntarily improve the design of the software.[3] This is in contrast to proprietary software, where the software is under restrictive copyright and the source code is usually hidden from the users. The benefits of using FOSS can include decreased software costs, increased security and stability (especially in regard to malware), protecting privacy, education, and giving users more control over their own hardware. Free, open-source operating systems such as Linux and descendants of BSD
BSD
are widely utilized today, powering millions of servers, desktops, smartphones (e.g
[...More...]

"Free And Open-source Software" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

NewsForge
Geeknet, Inc. is a Fairfax County, Virginia–based company that owns the online retailer ThinkGeek and is a subsidiary of GameStop.[3] The company was formerly known as VA Research, VA Linux Systems, VA Software, and SourceForge, Inc.. It was founded in 1993 and was formerly headquartered in Mountain View, California.[1]Contents1 History1.1 VA Research1.1.1 Initial public offering 1.1.2 Acquisition of Andover.net 1.1.3 Japanese Partnership 1.1.4 Astounding sales growth1.2 VA Software 1.3 SourceForge & OSDN 1.4 Geeknet2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] VA Research[edit] VA Research was founded in November 1993[1] by Stanford University graduate student Larry Augustin and James Vera
[...More...]

"NewsForge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

LWN.net
LWN.net is a computing webzine with an emphasis on free software and software for Linux and other Unix-like operating systems. It consists of a weekly issue, separate stories which are published most days, and threaded discussion attached to every story. Most news published daily are short summaries of articles published elsewhere, and are free to all viewers. Original articles are usually published weekly on Thursdays and are available only to subscribers for one week, after which they become free as well. LWN.net is part of Eklektix, Inc. LWN caters to a more technical audience than other Linux/free software publications
[...More...]

"LWN.net" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Open-source License
An open-source license is a type of license for computer software and other products that allows the source code, blueprint or design to be used, modified and/or shared under defined terms and conditions.[1][2] This allows end users and commercial companies to review and modify the source code, blueprint or design for their own customization, curiosity or troubleshooting needs. Open-source licensed software is mostly available free of charge, though this does not necessarily have to be the case. Licenses which only permit non-commercial redistribution or modification of the source code for personal use only are generally not considered as open-source licenses
[...More...]

"Open-source License" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Andrew Morton (computer Programmer)
Andrew Keith Paul Morton (born 1959) is an Australian software engineer, best known as one of the lead developers of the Linux kernel. He is currently a co-maintainer of the Ext3 file system and the journaling layer for block devices (JBD). In the late 1980s, he was one of the partners of a company in Sydney, Australia that produced a kit computer called the Applix 1616, as well as a hardware engineer for the (now-defunct) Australian gaming equipment manufacturer Keno Computer Systems. He holds an honours degree in electrical engineering from the University of New South Wales in Australia. Morton maintains a Linux kernel patchset known as the mm tree, which contains work-in-progress patches that might later be accepted into the official Linux tree maintained by Linus Torvalds
[...More...]

"Andrew Morton (computer Programmer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

OSDL
Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) was a non-profit organization supported by a global consortium tasked to "accelerate the deployment of Linux for enterprise computing."[1] Founded in 2000, its goals included "to be the recognized center-of-gravity for the Linux industry." OSDL positioned itself as the "industry's first independent, non-profit lab for developers who are adding enterprise capabilities to Linux."[2] The headquarters was first incorporated in San Francisco but later relocated to Beaverton in Oregon with second facility in Yokohama, Japan.[3] On January 22, 2007, OSDL and the Free Standards Group merged to form the Linux Foundation, narrowing their respective focuses to that of promoting Linux.[4]Contents1 Activities1.1 Working groups2 See also 3 ReferencesActivities[edit] OSDL sponsored key industry projects, including industry initiatives to enhance Linux for use in corporate data centres, in telecommunications networks, and on desktop computers
[...More...]

"OSDL" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Linux Kernel Mailing List
The Linux kernel mailing list (LKML) is the main electronic mailing list for Linux kernel development,[1][2] where the majority of the announcements, discussions, debates, and flame wars over the kernel take place.[3] Many other mailing lists exist to discuss the different subsystems and ports of the Linux kernel, but LKML is the principal communication channel among Linux kernel developers.[4] It is a very high-volume list, usually receiving about 1,000 messages each day, most of which are kernel code patches. Linux utilizes a workflow governed by LKML,[5] which is the Bazaar where kernel development takes place
[...More...]

"Linux Kernel Mailing List" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Flaming (Internet)
Flaming is a hostile and insulting interaction between persons over the Internet, often involving the use of profanity. It can also be the swapping of insults back and forth or with many people teaming up on a single victim. Flaming usually occurs in the social context of an Internet forum, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), Usenet, by e-mail, game servers such as Xbox Live or PlayStation Network, social media services, and on video-sharing websites such as YouTube. It is frequently the result of the discussion of heated real-world issues such as politics, religion, and philosophy, or of issues that polarize sub-populations, but can also be provoked by seemingly trivial differences. Deliberate flaming, as opposed to flaming as a result of emotional discussions, is carried out by individuals known as flamers, who are specifically motivated to incite flaming
[...More...]

"Flaming (Internet)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Software Release Life Cycle
A software release life cycle is the sum of the stages of development and maturity for a piece of computer software: ranging from its initial development to its eventual release, and including updated versions of the released version to help improve software or fix software bugs still present in the software.Contents1 History 2 Stages of development2.1 Pre-alpha 2.2 Alpha 2.3 Beta2.3.1 Open and closed beta2.4 Release candidate3 Release3.1 Release to manufacturing (RTM) 3.2 General availability (GA) 3.3 Release to web (RTW)4 Support4.1 End-of-life5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyHistory[edit] Usage of the "alpha/beta" test terminology originated at IBM. As long ago as the 1950s (and probably earlier), IBM used similar terminology for their hardware development. "A" test was the verification of a new product before public announcement. "B" test was the verification before releasing the product to be manufactured
[...More...]

"Software Release Life Cycle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Richard Stallman
Richard Matthew Stallman (/ˈstɔːlmən/; born March 16, 1953), often known by his initials, rms[1]—is an American free software movement activist and programmer. He campaigns for software to be distributed in a manner such that its users receive the freedoms to use, study, distribute and modify that software. Software that ensures these freedoms is termed free software
[...More...]

"Richard Stallman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

GNU Project
The GNU
GNU
Project /ɡnuː/ ( listen)[3] is a free-software, mass-collaboration project, first announced on September 27, 1983 by Richard Stallman
Richard Stallman
at MIT. Its aim is to give computer users freedom and control in their use of their computers and computing devices, by collaboratively developing and providing software that is based on the following freedom rights: users are free to run the software, share it (copy, distribute), study it and modify it. GNU
GNU
software guarantees these freedom-rights legally (via its license), and is therefore free software; the use of the word "free" always being taken to refer to freedom. In order to ensure that the entire software of a computer grants its users all freedom rights (use, share, study, modify), even the most fundamental and important part, the operating system (including all its numerous utility programs), needed to be free software
[...More...]

"GNU Project" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Free Software
Free software
Free software
or libre software[1][2] is computer software distributed under terms that allow users to run the software for any purpose as well as to study, change, and distribute it and any adapted versions.[3][4][5][6][7] Free software
Free software
is a matter of liberty, not price: users —individually or in cooperation with computer programmers— are free to do what they want with their copies of a free software (including profiting from them) regardless of how much is paid to obtain the program.[8][2] Computer programs are deemed free insofar as they give users (not just the developer) ultimate control over the first, thereby allowing them to control what their devices are programmed to do.[5][9] The right to study and modify a computer program entails that source code —the preferred format for making changes— be made available to users of that program
[...More...]

"Free Software" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alan Cox
Alan Cox (born 22 July 1968) is a British computer programmer who has been a key figure in the development of the Linux operating system that runs on the overwhelming majority of web servers that operate on the modern internet. He maintained the 2.2 branch of the Linux kernel and continues to be heavily involved in the development of the Linux kernel, an association that dates back to 1991. He lives in Swansea, Wales, where he lived with his wife Telsa Gwynne, who died in 2015.[1][2][3][4]Contents1 Involvement in the Linux kernel 2 Model trains 3 Activism 4 Awards 5 References 6 External linksInvolvement in the Linux kernel[edit]Alan Cox at the LinuxWorldExpoWhile employed on the campus of Swansea University, Cox installed a very early version of Linux on one of the machines belonging to the university computer society. This was one of the first Linux installations on a busy network and revealed many bugs in the networking code
[...More...]

"Alan Cox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.