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Backgammon
Backgammon
Backgammon
is one of the oldest known board games. Its history can be traced back nearly 5,000 years to archeological discoveries in the Middle East.[1][2] It is a two player game where each player has fifteen pieces (checkers) which move between twenty-four triangles (points) according to the roll of two dice. The objective of the game is to be first to bear off, i.e. move all fifteen checkers off the board. Backgammon
Backgammon
is a member of the tables family, one of the oldest classes of board games. Backgammon
Backgammon
involves a combination of strategy and luck (from rolling dice). While the dice may determine the outcome of a single game, the better player will accumulate the better record over series of many games, somewhat like poker.[3] With each roll of the dice, players must choose from numerous options for moving their checkers and anticipate possible counter-moves by the opponent
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Bahamas
Coordinates: 24°15′N 76°00′W / 24.250°N 76.000°W / 24.250; -76.000Commonwealth of the BahamasFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Forward, Upward, Onward, Together"Anthem: "March On, Bahamaland"Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"Capital and largest city Nassau 25°4′N 77°20′W / 25.067°N 77.333°W / 25.067; -77.333Official languages EnglishRecognised regional languages Bahamianese[a]Ethnic groups (2016) 92.7% African 4.7% European 2.1% Mixed 1.9% other[1][2]Demonym BahamianGovernment Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy[3][4]• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor-GeneralDame Marguerite Pindling• Prime MinisterHubert MinnisLegislature Parliament• Upper houseSenate• Lower houseHouse of AssemblyIndependence• from the United Kin
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Horseshoe
A horseshoe is a fabricated product, normally made of metal, although sometimes made partially or wholly of modern synthetic materials, designed to protect a horse's hoof from wear. Shoes are attached on the palmar surface (ground side) of the hooves, usually nailed through the insensitive hoof wall that is anatomically akin to the human toenail, although much larger and thicker. However, there are also cases where shoes are glued. The fitting of horseshoes is a professional occupation, conducted by a farrier, who specializes in the preparation of feet, assessing potential lameness issues, and fitting appropriate shoes, including remedial features where required. In some countries, such as the United Kingdom, horseshoeing is legally restricted to only people with specific qualifications and experience
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Paradise Island
Paradise Island
Paradise Island
is an island in the Bahamas
Bahamas
formerly known as Hog Island. The island, with an area of 277 hectares (685 acres)[1] (2.8 km2/1.1 sq mi), is located just off the shore of the city of Nassau, which is itself located on the northern edge of the island of New Providence. It is best known for the sprawling resort Atlantis with its extensive water park rides, pools, beach, restaurants, walk-in aquarium and casinos.[2][3][4] Paradise Island
Paradise Island
is connected to the island of New Providence
New Providence
by two bridges that cross Nassau Harbour
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Nevada
Nevada
Nevada
(/nɪˈvædə/; see pronunciations) is a state in the Western, Mountain West, and Southwestern regions of the United States
United States
of America. It borders Oregon
Oregon
to the northwest, Idaho
Idaho
to the northeast, California
California
to the west, Arizona
Arizona
to the southeast and Utah
Utah
to the east. Nevada
Nevada
is the 7th most extensive, the 34th most populous, but the 9th least densely populated of the 50 United States
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Las Vegas Valley
The Las Vegas
Las Vegas
Valley is a major metropolitan area in the southern part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Nevada
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US Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Tournaments
A tournament is a competition involving a relatively large number of competitors, all participating in a sport or game. More specifically, the term may be used in either of two overlapping senses:One or more competitions held at a single venue and concentrated into a relatively short time interval. A competition involving a number of matches, each involving a subset of the competitors, with the overall tournament winner determined based on the combined results of these individual matches. These are common in those sports and games where each match must involve a small number of competitors: often precisely two, as in most team sports, racket sports and combat sports, many card games and board games, and many forms of competitive debating. Such tournaments allow large numbers to compete against each other in spite of the restriction on numbers in a single match.These two senses are distinct
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Internet
The Internet
Internet
is the global system of interconnected computer networks that use the Internet protocol suite
Internet protocol suite
(TCP/IP) to link devices worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of private, public, academic, business, and government networks of local to global scope, linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless, and optical networking technologies
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Club (organization)
A club is an association of two or more people united by a common interest or goal. A service club, for example, exists for voluntary or charitable activities; there are clubs devoted to hobbies and sports, social activities clubs, political and religious clubs, and so forth.Contents1 History1.1 Origins of the word and concept 1.2 In Shakespeare's day 1.3 Coffee houses 1.4 18th and 19th century 1.5 Worldwide2 Types of clubs2.1 Buying club 2.2 Country or sports club 2.3 Fraternities and sororities 2.4 Hobby club 2.5 Personal club 2.6 Professional societies 2.7 School club 2.8 Service club 2.9 Social activities club 2.10 Social club3 See also 4 NotesHistory[edit]Historical image of Pall Mall with the Carlton Club, describing itself as the "oldest, and most important of all Conservative clubs.Historically, clubs occurred in all ancient states of which we have detailed knowledge
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Carmina Burana
Carmina Burana
Carmina Burana
(/ˈkɑːrmɪnə bʊˈrɑːnə/, Latin
Latin
for "Songs from Beuern"; "Beuern" is short for Benediktbeuern) is the name given to a manuscript of 254[1] poems and dramatic texts mostly from the 11th or 12th century, although some are from the 13th century. The pieces are mostly bawdy, irreverent, and satirical. They were written principally in Medieval Latin, a few in Middle High German, and some with traces of Old French. Some are macaronic, a mixture of Latin
Latin
and German or French vernacular. They were written by students and clergy when the Latin
Latin
idiom was the lingua franca throughout Italy and western Europe for travelling scholars, universities, and theologians. Most of the poems and songs appear to be the work of Goliards, clergy (mostly students) who satirized the Catholic Church
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Brownian Motion
Brownian motion
Brownian motion
or pedesis (from Ancient Greek: πήδησις /pέːdεːsis/ "leaping") is the random motion of particles suspended in a fluid (a liquid or a gas) resulting from their collision with the fast-moving molecules in the fluid.[1] This pattern of motion typically alternates random fluctuations in a particle's position inside a fluid sub-domain with a relocation to another sub-domain. Each relocation is followed by more fluctuations within the new closed volume. This pattern describes a fluid at thermal equilibrium, defined by a given temperature. Within such fluid there exists no preferential direction of flow as in transport phenomena. More specifically the fluid's overall linear and angular momenta remain null over time
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Mental Calculation
Mental calculation comprises arithmetical calculations using only the human brain, with no help from any supplies (such as pencil and paper) or devices such as a calculator. People use mental calculation when computing tools are not available, when it is faster than other means of calculation (such as conventional educational institution methods), or even in a competitive context. Mental calculation often involves the use of specific techniques devised for specific types of problems. Many of these techniques take advantage of or rely on the decimal numeral system
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Game Tree
In game theory, a game tree is a directed graph whose nodes are positions in a game and whose edges are moves. The complete game tree for a game is the game tree starting at the initial position and containing all possible moves from each position; the complete tree is the same tree as that obtained from the extensive-form game representation.The first two plies of the game tree for tic-tac-toe.The diagram shows the first two levels, or plies, in the game tree for tic-tac-toe. The rotations and reflections of positions are equivalent, so the first player has three choices of move: in the center, at the edge, or in the corner. The second player has two choices for the reply if the first player played in the center, otherwise five choices. And so on. The number of leaf nodes in the complete game tree is the number of possible different ways the game can be played
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Expected Value
In probability theory, the expected value of a random variable, intuitively, is the long-run average value of repetitions of the experiment it represents. For example, the expected value in rolling a six-sided dice is 3.5, because the average of all the numbers that come up in an extremely large number of rolls is close to 3.5. Less roughly, the law of large numbers states that the arithmetic mean of the values almost surely converges to the expected value as the number of repetitions approaches infinity. The expected value is also known as the expectation, mathematical expectation, EV, average, mean value, mean, or first moment. More practically, the expected value of a discrete random variable is the probability-weighted average of all possible values. In other words, each possible value the random variable can assume is multiplied by its probability of occurring, and the resulting products are summed to produce the expected value
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Middle East
The Middle East[note 1] is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia, Turkey
Turkey
(both Asian and European), and Egypt
Egypt
(which is mostly in North Africa). The corresponding adjective is Middle Eastern and the derived noun is Middle Easterner. The term has come into wider usage as a replacement of the term Near East
Near East
(as opposed to the Far East) beginning in the early 20th century. Arabs, Turks, Persians, Kurds, and Azeris (excluding Azerbaijan) constitute the largest ethnic groups in the region by population.[2] Minorities of the Middle East
Middle East
include Jews, Baloch, Greeks, Assyrians, and other Arameans, Berbers, Circassians
Circassians
(including Kabardians), Copts, Druze, Lurs, Mandaeans, Samaritans, Shabaks, Tats, and Zazas. In the Middle East, there is also a Romani community
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