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Assyrian Siege Of Jerusalem
Both sides claim victory Kingdom of Judah
Kingdom of Judah
subjugated King Hezekiah
Hezekiah
of Judah remains in powerBelligerents Neo-Assyrian Empire Kingdom of JudahCommanders and leadersSennacherib's Rabshakeh Sennacherib's Rabsaris Sennacherib's T
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Battle Of Mount Zemaraim
The great Battle of Mount Zemaraim
Battle of Mount Zemaraim
was reported in the Bible
Bible
to have been fought in Mount Zemaraim, when the army of the Kingdom of Israel led by the king
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Campaigns Of Shalmaneser III
Shalmaneser III (Šulmānu-ašarēdu, "the god Shulmanu is pre-eminent") was king of Assyria
Assyria
(859–824 BC), and son of the previous ruler, Ashurnasirpal II.[1] His long reign was a constant series of campaigns against the eastern tribes, the Babylonians, the nations of Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
and Syria, as well as Kizzuwadna
Kizzuwadna
and Urartu. His armies penetrated to Lake Van
Lake Van
and the Taurus Mountains; the Hittites
Hittites
of Carchemish
Carchemish
were compelled to pay tribute, and the kingdoms of Hamath
Hamath
and Aram Damascus
Aram Damascus
were subdued
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Jewish History
Jewish history
Jewish history
is the history of the Jews, and their religion and culture, as it developed and interacted with other peoples, religions and cultures. Although Judaism
Judaism
as a religion first appears in Greek records during the Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(323 BCE – 31 BCE) and the earliest mention of Israel
Israel
is inscribed on the Merneptah Stele
Merneptah Stele
dated 1213–1203 BCE, religious literature tells the story of Israelites going back at least as far as c. 1500 BCE. The Jewish diaspora
Jewish diaspora
began with the Assyrian conquest and continued on a much larger scale with the Babylonian conquest. Jews
Jews
were also widespread throughout the Roman Empire, and this carried on to a lesser extent in the period of Byzantine rule in the central and eastern Mediterranean
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Campaigns Of Ashurbanipal
Ashurbanipal
Ashurbanipal
(Akkadian: Aššur-bāni-apli; Syriac: ܐܫܘܪ ܒܢܐ ܐܦܠܐ‎; 'Ashur is the creator of an heir'), also spelled Assurbanipal or Ashshurbanipal, was King of the Neo-Assyrian Empire from 668 BC to c
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Campaigns Of Esarhaddon
Esarhaddon
Esarhaddon
(Akkadian: Aššur-aḥa-iddina "Ashur has given a brother"; Hebrew: אֵסַר חַדֹּן‬, Modern ’ēsár ḥadón, Tiberian ’esār ḥādon;[1] Ancient Greek: Ασαρχαδδων;[2] Latin: Asor Haddan[2]) was a king of the Neo-Assyrian Empire
Neo-Assyrian Empire
who reigned 681 – 669 BC. He was the youngest son of Sennacherib
Sennacherib
and the West Semitic queen Naqi'a
Naqi'a
(Zakitu), Sennacherib's second wife.Contents1 Rise to power 2 Military campaigns 3 Death 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksRise to power[edit]Victory stele.When, despite being the youngest son, Esarhaddon
Esarhaddon
was named successor by his father, his elder brothers tried to discredit him
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Battle Of Diyala River
A battle is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces, or combatants. A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment.[1] A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish. Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy, whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility.[2] German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ..
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Battle Of The Wood Of Ephraim
According to 2 Samuel, the Battle of the Wood of Ephraim
Wood of Ephraim
was a military conflict between the rebel forces of the formerly exiled Israelite Prince Absalom
Absalom
against the royal forces of his father king David
David
during a short lived revolt.[1] Scholarly opinion is divided as to the historicity of the events in the Books of Samuel
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City Of David
The City of David
David
(Hebrew: עיר דוד‬, Ir David; literal translation to Arabic: مدينة داوود‎, Madina Dawud, common Arabic name: وادي حلوه, Wadi Hilweh) is an Israeli settlement and the archaeological site which is speculated to compose the original urban core of ancient Jerusalem.[1][2][3][4][5] First suggested in 1920, the name was used officially from the 1970s, following the capture of East Jerusalem
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Campaigns Of Sargon II
Sargon II
Sargon II
(Assyrian Šarru-ukīn (LUGAL-GI.NA 𒈗𒄀𒈾); Aramaic סרגן;[1] reigned 722–705 BC) was an Assyrian king
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Siege Of Gezer (c. 733 BC)
Gezer, or Tel Gezer
Gezer
(Hebrew: גֶּזֶר‬)(also Tell el-Jezer) is an archaeological site in the foothills of the Judaean Mountains
Judaean Mountains
at the border of the Shfela
Shfela
region roughly midway between Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and Tel Aviv. It is now an Israeli national park. In the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible, Gezer
Gezer
is associated with Joshua
Joshua
and Solomon. It became a major fortified Canaanite city-state in the first half of the 2nd millennium BCE
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Campaigns Of Tiglath Pileser III
Tiglath-Pileser III
Tiglath-Pileser III
(cuneiform: 𒆪𒋾𒀀𒂍𒊹𒊏 TUKUL.TI.A.É.ŠÁR.RA; Akkadian: Tukultī-apil-Ešarra, "my trust is in the son of the Ešarra"; Hebrew: תִּגְלַת פַּלְאֶסֶר‬, Modern Tīglat Pīl’eser, Tiberian Tīgelaṯ Pīle’eser) was a prominent king of Assyria in the eighth century BCE (ruled 745–727 BCE)[1][2] who introduced advanced civil, military, and political systems into the Neo-Assyrian Empire.[3][4] Tiglath-Pileser III
Tiglath-Pileser III
seized the Assyrian throne during a civil war and killed the royal family. He made sweeping changes to the Assyrian government, considerably improving its efficiency and security
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Shamshi-Adad V
Shamshi- Adad
Adad
V was the King of Assyria
Assyria
from 824 to 811 BC. He was named after the god Adad, who is also known as Hadad.[1][2]Contents1 Family 2 Reign 3 See also 4 NotesFamily[edit] Shamshi- Adad
Adad
was a son and successor of King Shalmaneser III, the husband of Queen Shammuramat (by some identified with the mythical Semiramis), and the father of Adad-nirari III, who succeeded him as king.[3] He was also a grandfather of Shalmaneser IV.[4][5] Reign[edit] The first years of Shamshi-Adad's reign saw a serious struggle for the succession of the aged Shalmaneser.Stela of the Assyrian king Shamshi- Adad
Adad
V from the temple of Nabu at Nimrud, Mesopotamia.The revolt was led by Shamshi-Adad's brother Assur-danin-pal, and had broken out already by 826 BC
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Battle Of Bitter Lakes
The battle of Bitter Lakes
Bitter Lakes
was a part of the military campaign of Shoshenq I
Shoshenq I
to the Kingdom of Judah
Kingdom of Judah
in 925 BC where he conquered many cities and towns including Jerusalem. The location of the conflict was at Bitter Lakes, that we can identify with the lakes to the north by the frontier channel that was developed in part to guard the eastern border of Egypt, although it is not certain that the channel reached that far south. The fortresses at the boundary served as a checkpoints for Asiatics
Asiatics
who attempted to enter Egypt
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Urartu-Assyria War
The Urartu– Assyria
Assyria
War was a conflict between the Kingdom of Urartu and the Neo-Assyrian Empire. The war began around 714 BC, with the invasion of Urartu
Urartu
by the Assyrian King Sargon II.[1] Sargon led multiple offensives deep into Urartian territory, amassing numerous victories in the war
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Campaigns Of Ashurnasirpal II
Ashur-nasir-pal II (transliteration: Aššur-nāṣir-apli, meaning "Ashur is guardian of the heir"[1]) was king of Assyria
Assyria
from 883 to 859 BC. Ashurnasirpal II
Ashurnasirpal II
succeeded his father, Tukulti-Ninurta II, in 883 BC. During his reign he embarked on a vast program of expansion, first conquering the peoples to the north in Asia Minor
Asia Minor
as far as Nairi and exacting tribute from Phrygia, then invading Aram (modern Syria) conquering the Aramaeans
Aramaeans
and neo Hittites
Hittites
between the Khabur and the Euphrates
Euphrates
Rivers. His harshness prompted a revolt that he crushed decisively in a pitched, two-day battle. According to his monument inscription, while recalling this massacre he says:[2]“ Their men young and old I took prisoners
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