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Aphrodite Urania
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Urania (Ancient Greek: Οὐρανία) was an epithet of the Greek goddess Aphrodite, signifying "heavenly" or "spiritual", to distinguish her from her more earthly aspect of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Pandemos, " Aphrodite
Aphrodite
for all the people".[2] The two were used (mostly in literature) to differentiate the more "celestial" love of body and soul from purely physical lust
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Solon
Solon
Solon
(Greek: Σόλων Sólōn [só.lɔːn]; c. 638 – c. 558 BC) was an Athenian statesman, lawmaker and poet
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Tortoise
Tortoises (/ˈtɔːr.təs.ɪz/) are a family, Testudinidae, of land-dwelling reptiles in the order Testudines. Tortoises are shielded from predators by a shell. The top part of the shell is the carapace, the underside is the plastron, and the two are connected by the bridge. The carapace is fused to both the vertebrae and ribcage, and tortoises are unique among vertebrates in that the pectoral and pelvic girdles are inside the ribcage rather than outside. Tortoises can vary in size from a few centimeters to two meters. They are usually diurnal animals with tendencies to be crepuscular depending on the ambient temperatures. They are generally reclusive animals. Tortoises are the longest living land animal in the world, although the longest living species of tortoise is a matter of debate
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Symposium (Xenophon)
The Symposium (Greek: Συμπόσιον) is a Socratic dialogue written by Xenophon in the late 360's B.C.[1] In it, Socrates and a few of his companions attend a symposium (a lighthearted dinner party at which Greek aristocrats could have discussions and enjoy entertainment) hosted by Kallias for the young man Autolykos. Xenophon claims that he was present at the symposium, although this is disputed because he would have been too young to attend. The dramatic date for the Symposium is 422 B.C. Entertainment at the dinner is provided by the Syracusan and his three performers. Their feats of skill thrill the attendants and serve as points of conversation throughout the dialogue. Much of the discussion centers on what each guest is most proud of
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Christian Griepenkerl
Christian Griepenkerl (17 March 1839 – 22 March 1912) was a German painter and professor at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Honours and awards 4 Literature 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Griepenkerl was born to one of Oldenburg's leading families. As a young man, he heeded the advice of his fellow countryman, the landscapist Ernst Willers,[1] and went to Vienna in late 1855 in order to enroll at the private art school for monumental paintings founded four years earlier by Carl Rahl. Rahl allowed several of his students to participate in drafting and carrying out his paintings and thereby shaped their individual artistic development
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Hetaira
Hetaira
Hetaira
/hɪˈtaɪrə/ (plural hetairai (/hɪˈtaɪraɪ/), also hetaera /hɪˈtɪrə/ (plural hetaerae /hɪˈtɪriː/), (Ancient Greek: ἑταίρα, "companion", pl. ἑταῖραι) was a type of prostitute in ancient Greece. Traditionally, historians of ancient Greece have distinguished between hetairai and pornai, another class of Greek prostitute. In contrast to pornai, who provided sex for a large number of clients in brothels or on the street, hetairai were thought to have had only a few men as clients at any one time, to have had long-term relationships with them, and to have provided companionship and intellectual stimulation as well as sex.[1] For instance, Charles Seltman
Charles Seltman
wrote in 1953 that "hetaeras were certainly in a very different class, often highly educated women".[2] More recently, however, historians have questioned the extent to which there was really a distinction between hetairai and pornai
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Marriage
Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a socially or ritually recognised union between spouses that establishes rights and obligations between those spouses, as well as between them and any resulting biological or adopted children and affinity (in-laws and other family through marriage).[1] The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal
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Free Love
Free love
Free love
is a social movement that accepts all forms of love. The Free Love
Love
movement's initial goal was to separate the state from sexual matters such as marriage, birth control, and adultery. It claimed that such issues were the concern of the people involved, and no one else.[1]Contents1 Principles1.1 Relationship to feminism2 History2.1 Early precedents 2.2 Enlightenment thought 2.3 Utopian socialism 2.4 Origins of the movement2.4.1 United States 2.4.2 United Kingdom 2.4.3 Australia 2.4.4 France 2.4.5 Germany 2.4.6 USSR2.5 Recent3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 ReferencesPrinciples[edit] Much of the free love tradition reflects a liberal philosophy that seeks freedom from state regulation and church interference in personal relationships
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Swan
6–7 living, see text.SynonymsCygnanser Kretzoi, 1957Swans are birds of the family Anatidae
Anatidae
within the genus Cygnus. The swans' close relatives include the geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae
Anserinae
where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six or seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as the coscoroba swan, although this species is no longer considered one of the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though "divorce" does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure, and if a mate dies, the remaining swan will take up with another
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Globe
A globe is a spherical model of Earth, of some other celestial body, or of the celestial sphere. Globes serve similar purposes to maps, but unlike maps, do not distort the surface that they portray except to scale it down. A globe of Earth
Earth
is called a terrestrial globe. A globe of the celestial sphere is called a celestial globe. A globe shows details of its subject. A terrestrial globe shows land masses and water bodies. It might show nations and prominent cities and the network of latitude and longitude lines. Some have raised relief to show mountains. A celestial globe shows stars, and may also show positions of other prominent astronomical objects. Typically it will also divide the celestial sphere up into constellations. The word "globe" comes from the Latin
Latin
word globus, meaning "sphere". Globes have a long history
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Dione (mythology)
Dione (/daɪˈoʊniː/; Διώνη Dios "She-Zeus" or dios "divine one") is the name of four women in ancient Greek mythology, and one in the Phoenician mythology of Sanchuniathon. Dione is translated as "Goddess", and given the same etymological derivation as the names Zeus, Diana, et al. Very little information exists about these nymphs or goddesses, although at least one is described as beautiful and is sometimes associated with water or the sea. Perhaps this same one was worshiped as a mother goddess who presided over the oracle at Dodona, Greece and was called the mother of Aphrodite. One Dione is identified as the mother of the Roman goddess of love, Venus,[1] or equivalently as the mother of the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite; but Dione is also sometimes identified with Aphrodite.Contents1 Titaness/Oceanid 2 Nymph or sea-nymph 3 Phoenician goddess 4 References 5 SourcesTitaness/Oceanid[edit] Main article: Dione (Titaness) A Dione is among the Titanides or Titanesses
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Suda
The Suda
Suda
or Souda
Souda
(Medieval Greek: Σοῦδα, translit. Soûda; Latin: Suidae Lexicon[1]) is a large 10th-century Byzantine encyclopedia of the ancient Mediterranean world, formerly attributed to an author called Soudas (Σούδας) or Souidas (Σουίδας). It is an encyclopedic lexicon, written in Greek, with 30,000 entries, many drawing from ancient sources that have since been lost, and often derived from medieval Christian compilers
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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Phidias
Phidias
Phidias
or Pheidias (/ˈfɪdiəs/; Greek: Φειδίας, Pheidias; c. 480 – 430 BC) was a Greek sculptor, painter, and architect. His statue of Zeus
Zeus
at Olympia was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Phidias
Phidias
also designed the statues of the goddess Athena
Athena
on the Athenian Acropolis, namely the Athena
Athena
Parthenos inside the Parthenon, and the Athena
Athena
Promachos, a colossal bronze which stood between it and the Propylaea,[1] a monumental gateway that served as the entrance to the Acropolis
Acropolis
in Athens
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Leonhard Schmitz
Dr Leonhard Schmitz
Leonhard Schmitz
FRSE
FRSE
LLD (1807 – May 1890)[1] was a Prussian-born classical scholar and educational author, mainly active in the United Kingdom. He is sometimes referred to in the Anglicised version of his name Leonard Schmitz.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Schmitz was born in Eupen
Eupen
in what was then Prussia
Prussia
(now in Belgium) close to the Belgium/Germany border. He attended gymnasium in Aix-la-Chappelle to the east (now called Aachen
Aachen
and within modern day Germany). He lost his right arm in an accident at the age of 10, but nonetheless excelled academically
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William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
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