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Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Bactria–Margiana Archaeological Complex
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordi
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Mari, Syria
Mari (modern Tell Hariri, Arabic: تل حريري‎), was an ancient Semitic city in Syria. Its remains constitute a tell located 11 kilometers north-west of Abu Kamal
Abu Kamal
on the Euphrates
Euphrates
river western bank, some 120 kilometers southeast of Deir ez-Zor. It flourished as a trade center and hegemonic state between 2900 BC and 1759 BC.[note 1] As a purposely built city, the existence of Mari was related to its position in the middle of the Euphrates
Euphrates
trade routes; this position made it an intermediary between Sumer
Sumer
in the south and the Levant
Levant
in the west. Mari was first abandoned in the middle of the 26th century BC but was rebuilt and became the capital of a hegemonic East-Semitic state before 2500 BC
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Ebla
Ebla
Ebla
(Arabic: إبلا‎, modern: تل مرديخ, Tell Mardikh), was one of the earliest kingdoms in Syria. Its remains constitute a tell located about 55 km (34 mi) southwest of Aleppo
Aleppo
near the village of Mardikh. Ebla
Ebla
was an important center throughout the third millennium BC and in the first half of the second millennium BC. Its discovery proved the Levant
Levant
was a center of ancient, centralized civilization equal to Egypt
Egypt
and Mesopotamia, and ruled out the view that the latter two were the only important centers in the Near East during the early Bronze Age. The first Eblaite kingdom has been described as the first recorded world power. Starting as a small settlement in the early Bronze Age
Bronze Age
(c
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Jiroft Culture
A " Jiroft
Jiroft
culture"[1] has been postulated as an early Bronze Age
Bronze Age
(late 3rd millennium BC) archaeological culture, located in the territory of present-day Balochistan
Balochistan
and Kermān Provinces of Iran. The hypothesis is based on a collection of artifacts that were confiscated in Iran and accepted by many to have derived from the Jiroft
Jiroft
area in south central Iran, reported by online Iranian news services, beginning in 2001. The proposed type site is Konar Sandal, near Jiroft
Jiroft
in the Halil River area
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Ur
Ur (Sumerian: Urim;[1] Sumerian Cuneiform: 𒋀𒀕𒆠 URIM2KI or 𒋀𒀊𒆠 URIM5KI;[2] Akkadian: Uru;[3] Arabic: أور‎; Hebrew: אור‎) was an important Sumerian city-state in ancient Mesopotamia, located at the site of modern Tell el-Muqayyar (Arabic: تل المقير‎) in south Iraq's Dhi Qar Governorate.[4] Although Ur was once a coastal city near the mouth of the Euphrates
Euphrates
on the Persian Gulf, the coastline has shifted and the city is now well inland, on the south bank of the Euphrates, 16 kilometres (9.9 miles) from Nasiriyah
Nasiriyah
in modern-day Iraq.[5] The city dates from the Ubaid period
Ubaid period
circa 3800 BC, and is recorded in written history as a city-state from the 26th century BC, its first recorded king being Mesannepada
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Uruk
Uruk
Uruk
(/ˈuːrʊk/; Cuneiform: 𒌷𒀕 or 𒌷𒀔 URUUNUG; Sumerian: Unug; Akkadian: Uruk; Arabic: وركاء‎, Warkā'; Aramaic/Hebrew: אֶרֶךְ‬ Erech; Ancient Greek: Ὀρχόη, translit. Orchoē, Ὀρέχ Orech, Ὠρύγεια Ōrugeia) was an ancient city of Sumer
Sumer
(and later of Babylonia), situated east of the present bed of the Euphrates
Euphrates
river, on the dried-up, ancient channel of the Euphrates, some 30 km east of modern Samawah, Al-Muthannā, Iraq.[1] Uruk
Uruk
is the type site for the Uruk
Uruk
period. Uruk
Uruk
played a leading role in the early urbanization of Sumer
Sumer
in the mid-4th millennium BC. At its height c
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Sumer
Sumer
Sumer
(/ˈsuːmər/)[note 1] is the earliest known civilization in the historical region of southern Mesopotamia, modern-day southern Iraq, during the Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
and Early Bronze
Bronze
ages, and arguably the first civilization in the world with Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
and the Indus Valley.[1] Living along the valleys of the Tigris
Tigris
and Euphrates, Sumerian farmers were able to grow an abundance of grain and other crops, the surplus of which enabled them to settle in one place. Proto-writing
Proto-writing
in the prehistory dates back to c. 3000 BC
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Old Kingdom Of Egypt
The Old Kingdom is the period in the third millennium (c. 2686–2181 BC) also known as the 'Age of the Pyramids' or 'Age of the Pyramid Builders' as it includes the great 4th Dynasty when King Sneferu
Sneferu
perfected the art of pyramid building and the pyramids of Giza were constructed under the kings Khufu, Khafre, and Menkaure.[1] Egypt attained its first continuous peak of civilization – the first of three so-called "Kingdom" periods (followed by the Middle Kingdom and New Kingdom) which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile
Nile
Valley. The term itself was coined by eighteenth-century historians and the distinction between the Old Kingdom and the Early Dynastic Period is not one which would have been recognized by Ancient Egyptians
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Ancient Near East
Fertile Crescent Mesopotamia Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire Assyria Babylonia Neo-Assyrian Empire Neo-Babylonian Empire SumerEgyptAncient EgyptPersiaAchaemenid Empire Elam MedesAnatoliaHittites Hurrians Neo-Hittite
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Constitutional History Of Greece
In the modern history of Greece, starting from the Greek War of Independence, the Constitution of 1975/1986/2001 is the last in a series of democratically adopted Constitutions (with the exception of the Constitutions of 1968 and 1973 imposed by a dictatorship).Contents1 Greek War of Independence 2 From the absolute to the constitutional monarchy (1833–1924) 3 The Second Hellenic Republic
Second Hellenic Republic
and the Restoration (1925–1941) 4 The Kingdom of
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Third Hellenic Republic
Third Hellenic Republic
Third Hellenic Republic
(Greek: Γ΄ Ελληνική Δημοκρατία) is the period in modern Greek history that stretches from 1974, with the fall of Greek military junta and the final abolition of the Greek monarchy, to the present day. It is considered the third period of republican rule in Greece, following the First Republic during the Greek War of Independence (1821–32) and the Second Republic during the temporary abolition of the monarchy in 1924–35. The term "Metapolitefsi" (Μεταπολίτευση) is commonly used for this period, but this term concerns more often with the first years immediately after the fall of the military junta
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Axis Occupation Of Greece
The occupation of Greece
Greece
by the Axis Powers
Axis Powers
(Greek: Η Κατοχή, I Katochi, meaning "The Occupation") began in April 1941 after Nazi Germany invaded Greece
Greece
to assist its ally, Fascist Italy, which had been at war with Greece
Greece
since October 1940. Following the conquest of Crete, all of Greece
Greece
was occupied by June 1941. The occupation in the mainland lasted until Germany and its ally Bulgaria
Bulgaria
were forced to withdraw under Allied pressure in early October 1944
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Stato Da Màr
The Stato da Màr
Stato da Màr
or Domini da Mar ("State/Domains of the Sea") was the name given to the Republic of Venice's maritime and overseas possessions, including Istria, Dalmatia, Albania, Negroponte, the Morea
Morea
(the "Kingdom of the Morea"), the Aegean islands of the Duchy of the Archipelago, and the islands of Crete
Crete
(the "Kingdom of Candia") and Cyprus.[1] It was one of the three subdivisions of the Republic of Venice's possessions, the other two being the Dogado, i.e
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Early Modern Period
The early modern period of modern history follows the late Middle Ages of the post-classical era. Although the chronological limits of the period are open to debate, the timeframe spans the period after the late portion of the post-classical age (c. 1500), known as the Middle Ages, through the beginning of the Age of Revolutions (c
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