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Aegeus
In Greek mythology, Aegeus
Aegeus
(Ancient Greek: Αἰγεύς, translit. Aigeús) or Aegeas (Αιγέας, translit. Aigéas), was an archaic figure in the founding myth of Athens. The "goat-man" who gave his name to the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
was, next to Poseidon, the father of Theseus, the founder of Athenian institutions and one of the kings of Athens.Contents1 The Myth1.1 His reign 1.2 Conflict with Crete 1.3 Theseus
Theseus
and the Minotaur2 Legacy 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksThe Myth[edit]Themis and Aegeus. Attic red-figure kylix, 440–430 BCHis reign[edit] Upon the death of the king, Pandion II, Aegeus
Aegeus
and his three brothers, Pallas, Nisos, and Lykos, took control of Athens
Athens
from Metion, who had seized the throne from Pandion
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Sparta
Coordinates: 37°4′55″N 22°25′25″E / 37.08194°N 22.42361°E / 37.08194; 22.42361LacedaemonΣπάρτα / Λακεδαίμων900s–192 BCLambda was used by the Spartan army
Spartan army
as a symbol of Lacedaemon (Λακεδαίμων)Territory of ancient SpartaCapital SpartaLanguages Doric GreekReligion Greek polytheismGovernment Diarchy OligarchyKing See listLegislature GerousiaHistorical era Classical antiquity •  Foundation 900s BC •  Messenian War 685–668 BC •  Battle of Thermopylae 480 BC •  Peloponnesian War 431–404 BC •  Battle of Mantinea 362 BC •  Annexed by Achaea 192 BCPreceded by Succeeded byGreek Dark AgesAchaean LeagueRoman RepublicThis article contains special characters. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols.Hollow Lacedaemon
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Aphrodite Urania
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Urania (Ancient Greek: Οὐρανία) was an epithet of the Greek goddess Aphrodite, signifying "heavenly" or "spiritual", to distinguish her from her more earthly aspect of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Pandemos, " Aphrodite
Aphrodite
for all the people".[2] The two were used (mostly in literature) to differentiate the more "celestial" love of body and soul from purely physical lust
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Ancient Corinth
Coordinates: 37°54′19″N 22°52′49″E / 37.9053455°N 22.8801924°E / 37.9053455; 22.8801924CorinthΚόρινθος700 BC–338 BCCapital CorinthLanguages Doric GreekReligion Greek PolytheismGovernment OligarchyHistorical era Classical Antiquity •  Founding 700 BC •  Cypselus 657–627 BC •  Dissolution 338 BCPreceded by Succeeded byGreek Dark AgesMacedonian Empire Corinth
Corinth
(/ˈkɔːrɪnθ/; Greek: Κόρινθος Kórinthos) was a city-state (polis) on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnese
Peloponnese
to the mainland of Greece, roughly halfway between Athens
Athens
and Sparta. The modern city of Corinth
Corinth
is located approximately 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) northeast of the ancient ruins
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Panathenaic Games
The Panathenaic Games
Panathenaic Games
were held every four years in Athens
Athens
in Ancient Greece from 566 BC[1] to the 3rd century AD.[2] These Games incorporated religious festival, ceremony (including prize-giving), athletic competitions, and cultural events hosted within a stadium.Contents1 Religious festival 2 Ceremony 3 Cultural events 4 The Panathenaic Stadium 5 Contests 6 References 7 Further readingReligious festival[edit] The competitions for which this festival came to be known were only part of a much larger religious occasion; the Great Panathenaia itself. These ritual observances consisted of numerous sacrifices to Athena
Athena
(the name-sake of the event and patron deity to the hosts of the event - Athens) as well as Poseidon
Poseidon
and others
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Sacrificial Victims Of Minotaur
In Greek mythology, the people of Athens
Athens
were at one point compelled by King Minos
Minos
of Crete
Crete
to choose 14 young noble citizens (seven young men and seven maidens) to be offered as sacrificial victims to the half-human, half-taurine monster Minotaur
Minotaur
to be devoured in retribution for the death of Minos' son Androgeos. The victims were drawn by lots, were required to go unarmed, and would end up either being consumed by the Minotaur
Minotaur
or getting lost and perishing in the Labyrinth, the maze-like structure where the Minotaur
Minotaur
was kept
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Crete
Crete
Crete
(Greek: Κρήτη, Kríti ['kriti]; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica. Crete and a number of surrounding islands and islets constitute the region of Crete
Crete
(Greek: Περιφέρεια Κρήτης), one of the 13 top-level administrative units of Greece. The capital and the largest city is Heraklion. As of 2011[update], the region had a population of 623,065. Crete
Crete
forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece, while retaining its own local cultural traits (such as its own poetry and music). It was once the centre of the Minoan civilisation (c. 2700–1420 BC), which is the earliest known civilisation in Europe
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Krater
A krater or crater (Greek: κρατήρ, kratēr, lit. "mixing vessel") was a large vase in Ancient Greece, particularly used for watering down wine.Contents1 Form and function 2 Usage 3 Wine
Wine
dilution 4 Forms of kraters4.1 Column krater 4.2 Calyx krater 4.3 Volute
Volute
krater 4.4 Bell krater5 Metal kraters 6 Ornamental stone kraters 7 ReferencesForm and function[edit] Further information: Ancient Greek vase painting
Ancient Greek vase painting
and Pottery of ancient Greece At a Greek symposium, kraters were placed in the center of the room. They were quite large, so they were not easily portable when filled. Thus, the wine-water mixture would be withdrawn from the krater with other vessels, such as a kyathos (pl. kyathoi), an amphora (pl. amphorai)[1], or a kylix (pl. kylikes)[1]
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Asia
Metropolitan areas of Asia List of cities in AsiaList Bangkok Beijing Busan Chittagong Delhi Dhaka Doha Dubai Guangzhou Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Karachi Kuala Lumpur Manila Mumbai Osaka Pyongyang Riyadh Shanghai Shenzhen Singapore Seoul Taipei[4] Tehran Tokyo Ulaanbaatar Asia
Asia
(/ˈeɪʒə, ˈeɪʃə/ ( listen)) is Earth's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the Eastern and Northern Hemispheres. It shares the continental landmass of Eurasia with the continent of Europe
Europe
and the continental landmass of Afro- Eurasia
Eurasia
with both Europe
Europe
and Africa
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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Kerameikos
Kerameikos
Kerameikos
(Greek: Κεραμεικός, pronounced [ce.ɾa.miˈkos]) also known by its Latinized form Ceramicus, is an area of Athens, Greece, located to the northwest of the Acropolis, which includes an extensive area both within and outside the ancient city walls, on both sides of the Dipylon (Δίπυλον) Gate and by the banks of the Eridanos River. It was the potters' quarter of the city, from which the English word "ceramic" is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.Contents1 History and description 2 Archaeology 3 Museum 4 Metro station 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory and description[edit]Inner Kerameikos, view northwest
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Aethra (Greek Mythology)
Aethra or AETHRA may refer to: Aethra (Greek mythology), a number of different characters in Greek mythology Aethra (genus), a genus of crab in the family Aethridae AETHRA Componentes Automotivos, a Brazilian auto testing company Aethra, a fictional moon in the Colony Wars franchise 132 Aethra, an M-type main-belt asteroid The Aethra Chronicles, A 1994 MS-DOS Computer Role Playing Game, produced by Michael LawrenceThis disambiguation page lists ar
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Catullus
Gaius Valerius Catullus
Catullus
(/kəˈtʌləs/, (Latin pronunciation: [kaˈtʊlːʊs]; c. 84 – 54? BC) was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic
Roman Republic
who wrote chiefly in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes. His surviving works are still read widely and continue to influence poetry and other forms of art. Catullus's poems were widely appreciated by other poets. He greatly influenced Ovid, Horace, Virgil, and others. After his rediscovery in the Late Middle Ages, Catullus
Catullus
again found admirers. The explicit sexual imagery which he uses in some of his poems has shocked many readers
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Plutarch
Plutarch
Plutarch
(/ˈpluːtɑːrk/; Greek: Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: [plǔːtarkʰos]; c. CE 46 – CE 120),[1] later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος)[a] was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
and Moralia.[2] He is classified[3] as a Middle Platonist
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Metis (mythology)
Metis (/ˈmiːtɪs/; Greek: Μῆτις - "wisdom," "skill," or "craft"), in ancient Greek religion, was a mythological character belonging to the second generation of Titans. She was an Oceanid, the daughters of Oceanus
Oceanus
and his sister Tethys, who were three thousand in number, and was of an earlier age than Zeus
Zeus
and his siblings
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Bibliotheke
The Bibliotheca (Ancient Greek: Βιβλιοθήκη Bibliothēkē, "Library"), also known as the Bibliotheca of Pseudo-Apollodorus, is a compendium of Greek myths and heroic legends, arranged in three books, generally dated to the first or second century AD.[1] The author was traditionally thought to be Apollodorus of Athens, but that attribution is now regarded as false, and so "Pseudo-" was added to Apollodorus. The Bibliotheca has been called "the most valuable mythographical work that has come down from ancient times".[2] An epigram recorded by the important intellectual Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
Patriarch Photius I of Constantinople
expressed its purpose:It has the following not ungraceful epigram: 'Draw your knowledge of the past from me and read the ancient tales of learned lore. Look neither at the page of Homer, nor of elegy, nor tragic muse, nor epic strain
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