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7th Century BC
The 7th century
7th century
BC began the first day of 700 BC
700 BC
and ended the last day of 601 BC. The Assyrian Empire
Assyrian Empire
continued to dominate the Near East
Near East
during this century, exercising formidable power over neighbors like Babylon
Babylon
and Egypt. In the last two decades of the century, however, the empire began to unravel as numerous enemies made alliances and waged war from all sides. The Assyrians finally left the world stage permanently when their capital Nineveh
Nineveh
was destroyed in 612 BC
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Gyges Of Lydia
Gyges (/ˈdʒaɪdʒiːz/; Greek: Γύγης) was the founder of the third or Mermnad dynasty of Lydian kings and reigned from 716 BC to 678 BC. He was succeeded by his son Ardys II.Contents1 Attestations and etymology 2 Allegorical accounts of Gyges' rise to power 3 Reign and death 4 Mythical Gyges 5 Gift of Gyges to Delphi 6 Influence on modern works 7 Notes 8 External linksAttestations and etymology[edit] The name of the Lydian king Γύγης is attested many times in Greek transmission. In addition, the annals of the Assyrian king Assurbanipal, refer several times to Gu(g)gu, king of Luddi, to be identified with Gyges, king of the Lydians. [1] Many Bible
Bible
scholars[2] believe that Gyges of Lydia
Lydia
was the Biblical figure of Gog, ruler of Magog, who is mentioned in the Book of Ezekiel
Book of Ezekiel
and the Book of Revelation
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Near East
The Near East
Near East
is a geographical term that roughly encompasses Western Asia. Despite having varying definitions within different academic circles, the term was originally applied to the maximum extent of the Ottoman Empire
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History Of Ancient Egypt
The history of ancient Egypt
Egypt
spans the period from the early prehistoric settlements of the northern Nile
Nile
valley to the Roman conquest, in 30 BC
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Humban-nimena
Humban-Numena (or Kumban-Numena) was a king of Elam from the Igihalkid dynasty (Middle Elamite period, mid-14th century BCE). He was a son and the successor of Attar-kittah, as it is attested in his inscriptions from the temple in Liyan and in Susa.[1] He is mentioned as the father of King Untsah-Napirisha in a later inscription of King Shilhak-Inshushinak.[2] According to a Neo-Babylonian copy of a letter from an Elamite king to the Babylonian court (the so-called the Berlin letter), he married a daughter of Babylonian King Kurigalzu or a daughter of his uncle, Elamite King Pahir-ishsha.[3] See also[edit]Humbaba KhumbanReferences[edit]^ D.T. Potts, The Archaeology of Elam, 1999, p.209 ^ D.T. Potts, The Archaeology of Elam, 1999, p.205 ^ Enrique Quintana. Fliacion y Accesso al trono in Elam. Revue d'Assyriologie et d'archéologie orientale Vol. 104, (2010), pp. 54-56   This Iranian history-related article is a stub
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Phrygia
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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King Zhuang Of Zhou
China
China
portal King Zhuang of Zhou (died 682 BC) (Chinese: 周莊王; pinyin: Zhōu Zhuāng Wáng) or King Chuang of Chou was the fifteenth king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty[1] and the third of Eastern Zhou. He ruled 696–682 BC as a successor of his father, King Huan of Zhou
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Zhou Dynasty
The Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
or the Zhou Kingdom (/dʒoʊ/;[4] Chinese: 周朝; pinyin: Zhōu cháo [ʈʂóu ʈʂʰǎu]) was a Chinese dynasty that followed the Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
and preceded the Qin dynasty. The Zhou dynasty lasted longer than any other dynasty in Chinese history
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King Huan Of Zhou
King Huan of Zhou (Chinese: 周桓王; pinyin: Zhōu Húan Wáng; Wade–Giles: Chou Huan Wang; died 697 BC) was the fourteenth king of the Chinese Zhou Dynasty[3][4] and the second of the Eastern Zhou Dynasty
Dynasty
(770-256 BC). His given name was Lín.[5] King Huan’s father was King Ping’ son, Crown Prince Xiefu. Huan succeeded his grandfather in 719 BC.[6] The son and successor of Huan was King Zhuang of Zhou. In 707 BC, the royal forces were defeated in the Battle of Xuge (𦈡葛之战) by Duke Zhuang of Zheng (r.743-701)
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Tower Of Babel
The Tower
Tower
of Babel (Hebrew: מִגְדַּל בָּבֶל‬‎, Migdal Bāḇēl) as told in Genesis 11:1-9 is an origin myth meant to explain why the world's peoples speak different languages.[1][2][3][4] According to the story, a united humanity in the generations following the Great Flood, speaking a single language and migrating eastward, comes to the land of Shinar
Shinar
(שִׁנְעָר‬). There they agree to build a city and a tower tall enough to reach heaven
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Martin Heemskerck
Maerten van Heemskerck or Marten Jacobsz Heemskerk
Heemskerk
van Veen (1 June 1498 – 1 October 1574) was a Dutch portrait and religious painter, who spent most of his career in Haarlem. He was a pupil of Jan van Scorel, and adopted his teacher's Italian-influenced style. He spent the years 1532–6 in Italy. He produced many designs for engravers, and is especially known for his depictions of the Wonders of the World.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Italy 1.3 Later career2 Engravings2.1 Wonders of the World3 Paintings3.1 Parrots4 Death 5 Reputation 6 Public Collections 7 References 8 Sources 9 Further reading 10 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit]Family of Pieter Jan Foppesz. - painted before Heemskerck left for Italy in 1532.Heemskerck was born in the village of Heemskerk, North Holland, halfway between Alkmaar
Alkmaar
and Haarlem. He was the son of a farmer called Jacob Willemsz. van Veen
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Nineveh
Nineveh
Nineveh
(/ˈnɪnɪvə/; Akkadian: 𒌷𒉌𒉡𒀀 URUNI.NU.A Ninua) ; Syriac: ܢܝܼܢܘܹܐ‎ was an ancient Assyrian city of Upper Mesopotamia, located on the outskirts of Mosul
Mosul
in modern-day northern Iraq. It is located on the eastern bank of the Tigris
Tigris
River, and was the capital of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. Nowadays it is a common name for the half of Mosul
Mosul
which lies on the eastern bank of the Tigris. It was the largest city in the world for some fifty years[1] until the year 612 BC when, after a bitter period of civil war in Assyria, it was sacked by a coalition of its former subject peoples, the Babylonians, Medes, Chaldeans, Persians, Scythians
Scythians
and Cimmerians. Its ruins are across the river from the modern-day major city of Mosul, in the Ninawa Governorate
Ninawa Governorate
of Iraq
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Babylon
Babylon
Babylon
(𒆍𒀭𒊏𒆠KAN4.DIĜIR.RAKI Akkadian: Bābili(m); Aramaic: בבל, Babel; Arabic: بَابِل‎, Bābil; Hebrew: בָּבֶל‎, Bavel; Classical Syriac: ܒܒܠ‎, Bāwēl) was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the 18th to 6th centuries BC. The city was built on the Euphrates
Euphrates
river and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods
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Hanging Gardens Of Babylon
The Hanging Gardens of Babylon
Babylon
were one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World as listed by Hellenic culture, described as a remarkable feat of engineering with an ascending series of tiered gardens containing a wide variety of trees, shrubs, and vines, resembling a large green mountain constructed of mud bricks, and said to have been built in the ancient city of Babylon, near present-day Hillah, Babil province, in Iraq. According to one legend, the Neo-Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar II, who ruled between 605 and 562 BC, built the Hanging Gardens, alongside a grand palace that came to be known as "The Marvel of the Mankind", for his Median wife, Queen Amytis, because she missed
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